In many ways, Take Me is a very average film. It’s not the funniest thing ever nor is it the most dramatic. It’s certainly nothing special, production wise. Despite all that, I really liked it. 

The film is anchored by two lead performances. Pat Healy does a good job of being a sympathetic guy trying to get his life back in order after a breakup. He’s got good intentions, he truly believes his line of work has benefits, it’s just not entirely legal.

Taylor Schilling meanwhile is the most interesting thing about the film. We never really get a full grasp of her character. We’re never sure if what her character does is an act or if she’s genuine. So much of the film is spent trying to work out just what is and what isn’t real. It’s a tough role to fulfill, considering her performance is so vital to the main narrative of the film.

Speaking of which. There isn’t much of a story. A man is hired to kidnap someone, he does so and then it’s up to us and him, to determine whether or not the person he kidnapped was the same person who hired him. It’s an interesting premise that’s used very effectively. Luckily, the film is short too, had it been much longer, the whole idea would’ve felt stretched out and it wouldn’t have been able to maintain interest. With so many questions and possibilities presented, I was pleasantly surprised when we finally got answers. It doesn’t disappoint.

Take Me isn’t the greatest thing ever. As a comedy, it’s not all that special either. It has two great lead performances and a very interesting premise that keeps you guessing and thinking. It’s a film I liked far more than I expected, and I’m still thinking about it afterwards. 

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